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Using Drone Imagery to Generate Flood Inundation Models

Dar es Salaam is the largest city of Tanzania, it has an estimated 5.5 million residents and isĀ  also an economic centre for Tanzania and East Africa. Offset with this economic and social importance, Dar es Salaam has a tropical climate, experiencing two rainy seasons in a year (April – May and November – December). These seasons are usually accompanied with high rainfall, with high potential for flooding.

Installing a 3D Printing Weather Station in Tandale

Accurate and precise weather information is critical to preparing for extreme weather events, such as flooding. In Tanzania, the weather forecasts are primarily conducted by the Tanzanian Meteorological Agency (TMA) and are available through their website. But, the forecasts are at a regional level, the question is, how can we get an understanding of weather at a local level?

Creating Worldpop Inasafe Integration

As part of procedures in preparing better plans and risk reductions against natural disasters, Disaster Managers need accurate population data for the affected area. This helps in many ways from determining the scale of the disaster, impact assessment and analysis to planning for disaster resilience.

#TanzaniaCfR: Coding for Flood Resilience

Dar es Salaam and Stone Town are the two primary cities of Mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar, with populations of 5.5 million and 150,000 respectively. Each of these cities and their country have unique challenges and hazards. Dar es Salaam for instance is challenged by bi-annual flooding, impacting many thousands of its citizens every year.

Ramani Huria volunteers support #HapaUsafiTu

Independence Day and Republic Day in Tanzania falls on the 9th of December, typically a day off work with many people gathering at the National Stadium to watch parades match in front of the President. Dances are performed and a torch is carried up Mount Kilimanjaro, symbolising liberty and self-determination of the nations in Africa. However, in 2015, for the first time, the day will be celebrated in a very different way.

Floods hit homes, infrastructure in Jangwani

Last week, the water rose so quickly in Jangwani that residents had little warning before they had to flee their homes. As heavy rains filled the Msimbazi River, which cuts through this low-lying, unplanned settlement in central Dar Es Salaam, water backed up against a recently constructed bridge, breached a makeshift barrier of mud and trash, and poured into the settlement.